Navigate / search

Assertiveness Guide Book Review on PsychCentral

Assertiveness Guide for Women

Read this balanced review of The Assertiveness Guide for Women by Julia Patt for PsychCentral.com.

 From Lean In to The Female Brain, experts from diverse fields, with varying degrees of success, have tried to empower women to best understand their feelings and behaviors and act accordingly. The Assertiveness Guide for Women, by psychotherapist and clinical social worker  Hanks, follows in a similar vein, with the particular goal of helping women improve their communication, set healthy boundaries, and benefit their personal and professional relationships.

It is important to note Hanks’ areas of expertise in considering this book, because they have a significant impact on her approach. Her method is thoroughly imbedded in psychotherapeutic technique and theory, which may limit the scope of its applicability. Indeed, a book that is more concerned with childhood attachment types than the societal obstacles women face each day may not work for everyone.

Read more

30 Questions Nobody Asks My Husband at Church

Through the years, I’ve noticed certain patterns, even in seemingly benign small talk, that send powerful cultural messages regarding gender, potential, life decisions, and worth. These patterns became even more apparent after I got married and observed the kinds of questions directed to me in comparison to my husband.

How to Beat the Winter Blues: Dealing with Seasonal Depression

The winter months can bring excitement and joy as we celebrate the holidays, decorate the tree, and spend time with our loves ones. However, it can be quite a different experience for people with Seasonal Affective Disorder (also known as SAD). For these individuals, winter can be a time of gloom, despair, and hopelessness.

Read more

How to Build Trust with a Client Before the First Session

therapist relationship

A strong online presence helps potentials clients trust you and choose you when they are ready for therapy.

Clients sometimes have a hard time trusting a new therapist. It’s understandable: who feels comfortable telling their innermost problems to a complete stranger? But trust is a critical part of the client/ therapist relationship if any real progress is to be made. Thankfully, there are ways to build trust before your client even walks in the door.

Read more

4 Ways to Build a Thriving Practice in an Uncertain Economy

Since the economic downturn of 2008, my practice has experienced significant growth. I attribute that growth to these four strategies.

Our economy took a turn for the worse in 2008, stock market crashed, and many companies were forced to downsize.  It was a hard time for many Americans, financially and emotionally. And yet, during this same time frame, my practice Wasatch Family Therapy experienced exponential growth. We steadily acquired new clients. opened two additional locations and grew from half a dozen therapists to over 20 therapists.

So how did I do it?  I put time and energy into creating and maintaining a strong online presence.

Read more

The Power of Online Presence: Blogging Brings Training Opportunities for Art Therapist Lisa Mitchell LMFT

art-clock-300x241

Discover how some very successful mental health professionals use blogging, social media, and other technologies as powerful tools for their therapy practices.

Lisa Mitchell MFT, ATR, LPC, is director of The Art Therapy Studio in Sacramento, CA and owner of InnerCanvas.com. She helps teens and adults use their creativity to heal from trauma, depression, and anxiety. Read here about how Lisa’s online presence grew her outreach exponentially:

Read more

8 Steps to Launching or Relaunching a Psychotherapy Practice

Launch (3)

In this guest post, Miranda Palmer LMFT and Kelly Higdon share eight ways to thrive in the current private practice climate.

The process of building a successful private practice has changed considerably over the last twenty years. Most therapists we speak with who have been in practice for a few decades started by getting their credentials from an insurance companies. Reimbursement rates were relatively high for the cost of living from the 80s into the early 90s. Things flowed. Maybe they had a listing in the phone book, but back then there was no need for websites, Facebook pages, or Twitter accounts!

Fast forward to now: the financial picture for therapists in private practice has drastically changed, as we are in a time of low or stagnate reimbursement rates combined with an increase in cost of doing business and living.

The old model is simply that, old. It doesn’t work for today, and thus we find experienced therapists with a full practice that isn’t profitable enough to prepare for retirement, and new therapists often feel lost when they ask their mentors for direction and get answers that don’t resonate with the current economy.

Read more

4 Ways to Build a Thriving Practice in an Uncertain Economy

canstockphoto9071108

Since the economic downturn of 2008, my practice has experienced significant growth. I attribute that growth to these four strategies.

Our economy took a turn for the worse in 2008, stock market crashed, and many companies were forced to downsize.  It was a hard time for many Americans, financially and emotionally. And yet, during this same time frame, my practice Wasatch Family Therapy experienced exponential growth. We steadily acquired new clients. opened two additional locations and grew from half a dozen therapists to over 20 therapists.

So how did I do it?  I put time and energy into creating and maintaining a strong online presence.

Read more

How to Build Trust with a Client Before the First Session

therapist relationship

A strong online presence helps potentials clients trust you and choose you when they are ready for therapy.

Clients sometimes have a hard time trusting a new therapist.  It’s understandable: who feels comfortable telling their innermost problems to a complete stranger?  But trust is a critical part of the client/ therapist relationship if any real progress is to be made.  Thankfully, there are ways to build trust before your client even walks in the door.

Read more

5 Signs It’s Time To Raise Your Fees

It’s common for therapists in private practice to have anxiety around money issues like how much to charge per session, how to ask clients for payment, and when to raise your fees. Getting comfortable talking about fees with clients is crucial to private practice success.

After all, you own a business. In general, I think therapists charge too little for their services.

Several years ago, I resigned from managed care and I raised my psychotherapy fees at the same time. Fortunately, my practice didn’t suffer financially from those decisions. What surprised me most about raising my per session fee was that the perceived value of my services went up. “You don’t take insurance and charge a lot? You must be really good,” was a sentiment that I heard frequently from potential clients.

Interestingly, I’ve found that clients tend to invest more in the therapy process because they are investing more money out of their own pocket for treatment.

Read more