Navigate / search

Managing Technology Overload: Studio 5

Have you ever looked around in a public place to see how many people were using their phones (texting, surfing the web, etc.)? It’s usually a lot, and truthfully it can be a little discouraging to witness individuals staring at their screens instead of talking to one another. Please don’t misunderstand, I am a huge advocate of technology; it’s profoundly changed my life and career for the better! Still, we all know that things can get out of hand if we let them. Digital overload affects our ability to process information cognitively, to be mindful of our own experience, and to be present with other people. Here are some ways to help you manage your technology use (instead of letting it control you):

Ask Julie: I Feel Like a Failure As A Mom And Fiancee

Q: I am a stay-at-home mom, and lately, I have been feeling like a failure. I feel like I can’t do anything right and that everything I do goes unnoticed. I have a wonderful fiance, who works hard to take care of our family and who loves me very much, but the problem lies with me. I can’t express my feelings to him. I have so much guilt inside of me: I feel guilty when I need money and my fiance gives it to me. I feel guilty if he comes home and the house isn’t spotless, even when the baby was a handful. I feel guilty if I take time for myself or if we go out without the baby. I feel guilty when the little one cries or throws tantrums when my fiance is at home, because I am supposed to be a good mother and a good housekeeper and a good fiancee, but I don’t feel like I am. I am a failure at everything, and I am just so sick of crying everyday. How do I get past this? Please, please help me.

A: Thanks for your email. You sure put a lot of pressure on yourself! But who says you have to be a perfect fiancée, house keeper, or good at finances? It sounds like you want to be more than just good at those things, it sounds like you want to be perfect. I wonder if there’s something deeper going on, or how you learned to be so hard on yourself. Watch the video for the full answer.

Take good care of yourself!

Julie Hanks, LCSW

Ask Julie: How To Move On After Betrayal

I was with my ex for only a few months, but as far as I was concerned it was a serious relationship. Towards the beginning of our relationship we discussed various issues which we both had – he had been sexually abused as a young child, and I had been sexually assaulted only a year before I met him. We discussed these issues and how they affected us in terms of our relationships with other people. I realise it sounds naive, but I fell in love with him and would have done anything to help him. He confided in me that he was in a substantial amount of debt and was constantly worried that his house and possessions would be repossessed etc., and despite the fact that I am a student and have very little money to myself, I had a part-time job (while he was unable to find a job) and lent him around £1000. He always swore that he would pay this money back, but after splitting up with me he decided that he wouldn’t. Legally, I can’t do anything about this because neither of us signed any kind of contract.

Read more

Twitter 101: Use ‘Lists’ To Follow Favorite Tweeps

Twitter home feed can be overwhelming for new users. The more people you follow, the more tweets show up on your profile page feed. Who has hours every day to read thousands of tweets? I sure don’t. That’s where Twitter “Lists” come in. I received this question from a therapist via email earlier this week, and it echoes the concerns of many therapists I’ve consulted with. How do I highlight users that I’m really interested in so I don’t have to sort through the home feed?

Read more

Practicing Outside The Box: Growing Tomatoes In Psychotherapy

tomato in square

Stuck in a therapeutic rut? Find inspiration from other therapist’s creative strategies and get outside the box!

As therapists, especially those of us who have been practicing for a few years, it’s easy to get into a rut and become less creative than we were as eager, bright-eyed interns. Feeling the need to be more creative in the therapy hour inspired me to reach out to other therapists for ideas and inspiration and start this series about practicing outside of the box.

Because I managed to kill every plant I have ever owned (I have a “black thumb”) and because I have always fantasized about living in New York City, I was intrigued by psychotherapist Janet Zinn, LCSW’s use of “outside the box” strategies to help her clients. Janet found that incorporating nature in the form of a garden in the middle of a New York City practice was a welcome and healing environment for her clients.

Read more

Ask Julie: I’m Anorexic and Want To Eat Dirt, Metal, Toilet Paper

QI have this uncontrollable urge to eat things! But then I want to stay skinny, my family has hidden all metal objects and all the things I want to eat such as toilet paper, dirt, t.v remotes, cats, cd’s. I was even tempted as I was writing this to eat the mouse, if this isn’t enough I am terrified to leave my house. My anorexia has been bad and I’ve developed a phobia to tomatoes the only things I eat are crackers and sometimes water, but I always want to eat more things that I shouldn’t. When I was in the mental institution I didn’t have access to any of those things but now, I’m feeling the urge more than ever to eat inedible items. Please help me.

Read more

Ask Julie: How Do I Disengage From My Ex?

Q I was with my ex girlfriend for a year and half. A few months before our breakup she moved a few states away and we tried to maintain a long distance relationship. I did not go with her, because I was nearly finished with college.  At the time it seemed like a spur of the moment decision on her part to leave the area, but she really wanted to move out. When she was away, we talked about moving in together and other promising things

Read more

Practicing Outside The Box: Psychotherapy On The Client’s Couch

Michigan therapist finds niche providing in-home psychotherapy services

Would you travel to a client’s home to provide therapy? After witnessing the high no-show rates while working at community mental health centers Michigan, therapist Tomanika Witherspoon, LMSW, CEO of Growing Counseling Services, decided to do just that.

She created an “outside of the box” specialty practice by focusing on providing in-home therapy.

In Witherspoon’s experience, individuals who discontinued traditional therapy cited transportation, time and family responsibilities as the biggest barriers for receiving treatment. By providing in-home therapy, Witherspoon saves her clients travel time, travel expenses and time spent in an office waiting room.

Read more