Navigate / search

Will I See You Sunstone Summer Symposium 2016?

My first Mormon cultural blog article was title  “The Costs of Misunderstanding Modesty” (published on Meridian Magazine website). The response to the article was so positive that I continued to share my perspective writing a dozen or so articles and a few podcasts on Mormonism  published on a handful of different websites (including this blog).

I’m not sure how I jumped from writing blog articles on Mormonism to submitting proposals to present at the 2016 Sunstone Symposium in Salt Lake City, UT, but, I did. And both were accepted! These topics are informed by my doctoral studies in systems theory, cybernetics, and creative transformation and their application to Mormon cultural transformation.Even though I’ve been working with Latter-day Saint clients for over 20 years, and my first book, The Burnout Cure, was written for LDS women, it was less than a year ago I started blogging about the intersection of Mormon culture and emotional health.

  • Sunstone Summer Symposium 2016 “Many Mormonisms”

  • Thurs. July 28, 2016

  • University of Utah Student Union Bldg.

  • Pre-register now Sunstone.org

Here’s more about my upcoming presentations…

Read more

How to Help Your Anxious Daughter: Studio 5

All parents want to raise strong, confident, happy daughters, but there’s evidence showing that female adolescents are experiencing high levels of stress and anxiety. A recent article in the Deseret News suggests that young women are having a rough time; researchers are seeing anxiety, self-harm, and even suicide in girls as young as 10. In recent years, I have witnessed an increase in the number of referrals of young people (girls and boys) to my therapy practice who are experiencing these same sorts of issues. Clearly, we have a real cultural problem to address, and there’s certainly reason to be concerned. Read more

Join me THIS Thurs. for Aspiring Mormon Women Networking Event

AMW Networking Event Dr. Julie Hanks

Come meet & network with women in the Aspiring Mormon Women community & participate in a discussion about how to “Create the Life You Want by Overcoming Aspirational Shame.”

What is ‘aspirational shame’? Read about it here. 

Date: Thursday, June 2, 7-9 PM

Location: 8334 Monte Luca Way, Cottonwood Heights, UT

Tickets: Purchase tickets here

$20 ticket; space is limited to 80 people.
Business casual dress | Light refreshments

Read more

Is there a Burnout Epidemic Among Mormons?

A recent LDSLiving.com, “What to Do When You’re Overwhelmed at Church,” ended with a simple survey. It asked one question: Have you ever experienced spiritual fatigue or burnout? Over 1,900 people took the online survey, and a whopping 95 percent said that they had experienced burnout.

Ninety-five percent! Houston, we have a problem.
Read more

10 Reasons I’m Not Afraid to Use Trans-Friendly Bathrooms

I am scared that we are using transgender bathroom policies as a way to avoid discussing the real concerns – sexual assault and all forms of victimization. I am afraid that by framing concerns about transgender bathroom policies, we are further victimizing an already victimized populations. I am afraid that we are using this discussion to avoid engaging in more complex discussions about stopping the glorification of violence and our cultural obsession with sex.

Pride in Disguise: 4 Facades of False Humility

Pride is often referred to as the universal sin. From the perspective of LDS theology, this seems pretty accurate; pride caused Satan to rebel against heaven, pride led to the downfall of ancient civilizations, pride is the driving factor that has caused evil individuals throughout history to come to power, and anyone who has studied the Book of Mormon has probably heard of the pride cycle. However, for this discussion, I’d like to move away from the archetypal, “big picture” idea of pride to focus on the perspective of it as an individual characteristic, that is, of personal pride.

Read more

Ask Julie: How Do I Stop Feeling Depressed, Angry, and Irritable?

Q: I was diagnosed with depression and anxiety a little more than a year ago, (although I have been feeling this way for a really long time.) I feel like I’m angry all the time. I want to be happy, but sometimes I feel like the anger is just always there. I have a wonderful husband and family and am happy with them, but I just cannot seem to shake this feeling. The littlest things bother me to where I can hold a grudge. I feel like I’m irritable a lot of the time, and sometimes, I feel as though I could just scream at any moment. Other times, I just feel like crying. I would really appreciate some feedback about this and maybe some type of mental exercises that I can do to start controlling all this built-up anger before it gets any worse.

A: Thank you for writing in. You said you were diagnosed with depression and anxiety but I’m curious if you’re being treated for it currently? If you are on any type of medication, I suggest that you talk with your health care provider and make sure that the dosage and medication is actually helping. Please watch the video for the complete answer.

Take good care of yourself!

Julie Hanks, LCSW

5 Myths About Forgiveness: Studio 5

13100837_1177681958931444_1699521208603478215_n

It’s a common saying that we should forgive and forget when someone offends us, but the truth is that there’s a little more to forgiveness than that. Throughout my years as a therapist, I’ve worked with many clients who struggled with the concept of forgiveness (what it means, how to do it, etc.). Whether it’s with minor offenses or severe abuse, we don’t always quite get the whole idea of forgiveness. I define forgiveness as ceasing to feel resentment toward someone who’s wronged us. Forgiveness is beautiful and can heal hearts and relationships, but I think we still may misunderstand it at times. Here are some common myths about forgiveness:
Read more

5 Ways Mormons Can Teach Healthy Sexuality

Several months ago, my 8 year-old-daughter noticed the difference between her body and my 46-year-old-mother-of-four body and was asking questions. Throughout her life, my husband and I have used anatomically correct terms when talking about the human body, invited questions about birth and breastfeeding, talked about how babies are born, and have even gotten into a few specifics. We had been having discussions long enough that we had almost exhausted her questions.

Except for one.

Read more

Are Your Boundaries Being Crossed? PsychCentral Interview

Figuring out where to set boundaries and knowing how to set them can be challenging. I recently interviewed

(By the way, the photo to the left is of me and my dear friend and colleague, Joe Sanok. He actually has very good boundaries but I think it’s such a great picture.)

Read more